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Trump equates white nationalists to counterprotesters, saying there was violence in Charlottesville coming from "both sides"; flash floods in Sierra Leone kill hundreds; Alabama's special election heats up. [Read More]
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For 24 hours, Republicans in Congress thought they were in the clear — President Donald Trump had answered their calls and condemned by name the neo-Nazi hate groups who participated in a violent white supremacy rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Then on Tuesday, the president held a press conference that sounded largely like a defense of the alt-right and participants of the violent rally, prompting a number of top Republican legislators to admonish him once again. We must be clear. White supremacy is repulsive. This bigotry is counter to all this country stands for. There can be... [Read More]
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David Duke, Richard Spencer, and others are tweeting their praise for Trump's latest statements on the "Unite the Right" rally violence. Just a day after President Trump issued a prepared statement condemning extremists and racism, he pivoted once again, coming to the defense of those who protested the removal of a Confederate flag in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend at a rally that turned violent. In their defense, Trump posed that the people involved were not all necessarily neo-Nazis, and were there to simply fight against the removal of the Robert E. Lee statue. He asked a... [Read More]
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President Donald Trump lashed out about the weekend violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, Tuesday in what largely sounded like a defense of the alt-right. In a short, impromptu press conference, flanking a speech on infrastructure, Trump defended some of the white supremacy rally's participants, made the case for Confederate statues, and equated neo-Nazis to leftist activist groups. At the end, he threw in a plug for the Trump Winery in Charlottesville — "one of the largest wineries in the United States." On Saturday, a Nazi sympathizer at a white supremacy rally in Charlottesville — whose mother identified as a... [Read More]
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When a driver rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters at a rally of white nationalists, white supremacists, and neo-Nazis in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday, one person — Heather Heyer — died. President Trump, in his third public statement on the violence, said it was important to hear both sides, and defended the rallies as drawing "many people … other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists" who have been treated "absolutely unfairly." Then, after standing up for attendees at a rally where swastika flags were on full display, he stood up for Confederate monuments: "This week, it is Robert... [Read More]
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He's more honest when he's off script. In a press appearance at Trump Tower Tuesday, President Donald Trump decided to take questions from the media — and he made clear that his true opinions on this weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Virginia are very different from the staff-scripted statement he read Monday. Indeed, the president went out of his way to defend the demonstrations, repeatedly arguing that while some demonstrators were "very bad people," others were "very fine people." Trump also emphasized that many counterprotestors on "the other side" were "very, very violent." But in Trump's telling, the demonstrations were... [Read More]
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There's a pattern in how Trump talks about white supremacists versus people he clearly dislikes. [Read More]
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A new report analyzes what would happen if the administration failed to pay the cost-sharing reduction subsidies. [Read More]
Judge Roy Moore's crusade may be coming to Capitol Hill. HOMEWOOD, Alabama — Judge Roy Moore, perhaps the leading candidate in today's Alabama Senate race, pulled a laminated copy of Joseph Story's 1833 Commentaries on the Constitution out of his dusty maroon briefcase. He then flipped about halfway through it and, after running a ruddy finger up and down, pointed to a highlighted line about halfway down the page. His eyes lit up. "The answer is right here," Moore told me, quoting Story's explanation for the role of religion in American public life, as much from memory as... [Read More]
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often in the form of sugar-laden ketchup and greasy fries.) The consequences of this pattern are serious: There's a strong relationship between diets low in fruits and vegetables and obesity and diabetes... [Read More]
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Here's who is left. [Read More]
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which gets more optimistic every year... [Read More]
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While President Trump was engaged in an uncomfortable dance around condemning white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend, North Korea quietly walked back a threat to launch missiles in the direction of American bases on Guam. That's no coincidence. Experts think this deescalation — what analyst Robert Carlin calls "a decisive break in the action" — happened in part because the president's focus has been on Charlottesville since Friday night. "The media (and the president) was distracted over the weekend, which gave some breathing space for the situation," Jenny Town, the assistant director of the US-Korea... [Read More]
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The toppling of a Confederate monument led to a celebration of statues that deserve similar treatment. In the ongoing meme war between conservatives and liberals, Twitter has become a frequent battleground. But the dismantling of a Confederate statue by a group of protesters on Monday in Durham, North Carolina, has kicked off a back and forth that's become all too familiar of late: a tweet full of conservative outrage being immediately hijacked by bemused liberals and progressives who then transform it into an expression of sheer absurdity. In this instance, the catalyst was a tweet by actor James Woods,... [Read More]
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In the aftermath of the white supremacist "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville this weekend — and all the violence that ensued — a popular response from good white liberals was that #ThisIsNotUs. In other words: Blatant, violent racism is not a part of the real America. The Charlottesville rally was a perverse aberration, one that the rest of us have no part in. But the ideology of white supremacy — the ideology that eventually developed into Germany's Nazi party — is deeply embedded in the fabric of American culture. What happened in Charlottesville is us, and the... [Read More]
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But the threat still exists. North Korea just announced it won't imminently attack Guam. Kim Jong Un "will watch a little more the foolish and stupid conduct" of the United States before he decides to launch any missiles toward Guam, the country's state-run Korean Central News Agency reported on Monday. However, Kim warned that if the US persists in its "extremely dangerous reckless actions on the Korean peninsula and in its vicinity," he may reconsider his decision. This is the first major sign of deescalation by North Korea since both sides exchanged threats in the past week. And it... [Read More]
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"In many ways, Virginia is two states right now." This weekend, a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, protesting the removal of the city's monument to Robert E. Lee spun out of control, ultimately resulting in three deaths and dozens of injuries. The violence stunned the nation, but Virginia voters aren't strangers to the debate around Confederate monuments. Earlier this year, the very same statue of Lee became a campaign issue in the Republican primary for governor — and it nearly won candidate Corey Stewart the nomination. "It really is the issue in many ways that defined the... [Read More]
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Across America, some white pastors are confronting both the "Satanism" of white supremacy — and their own "silence." In the weeks leading up to Sunday, August 13, Emily C. Heath, a United Church of Christ pastor in Exeter, New Hampshire, was preparing her sermon for that day. It was going to be tied to one of that day's Bible readings: Matthew 14:22-33, the section of the gospels where Jesus encourages his disciple Peter to come to him over a stormy sea. Peter begins to walk on the water, only to become afraid and sink. Heath planned to use... [Read More]
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His voice at times shaking, the father of Heather Heyer, who died demonstrating against a white supremacy rally in the Charlottesville terror attack Saturday, said he forgives the man who killed her: "He don't know no better." Heather Heyer, 32, was killed in a crowd of anti-racism demonstrators when a Nazi sympathizer purposefully plowed his car through the protest. The man who killed her was at the white supremacy rally in support of President Donald Trump, according to his mother. "I'm proud of her," Mark Heyer, the victim's father, told Florida Today in a video interview. "I'm proud... [Read More]
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For the love of all good things, do not try to photograph the total solar eclipse. Here at Vox we are thoroughly convinced the August 21 total solar eclipse will be worth the hype. As we've learned from astronomers, astrophysicists, and eclipse-chasing enthusiasts, in the 70-mile-wide band of totality from Oregon to South Carolina, the moon will completely block out the sun, day will turn to twilight, stars and planets will appear, and the sun's ethereal atmosphere will dance in the sky. Many people say standing beneath a total solar eclipse is a life-changing experience. We're pumped. (Don't worry,... [Read More]
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