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Joe Arpaio, the controversial former sheriff from Arizona, announced this week that he will run for the U.S. Senate to help advance President Trump's agenda. But he's breaking from the president on people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. "Deport them," Arpaio told NPR's Morning Edition in an interview airing Thursday morning. "When we come across these kids, or some are older than just kids," Arpaio said, "then deport them. You deport them back to the country they came from." Arpaio, 85, is someone who has devoted his career is highly controversial... [Read More]
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit... [Read More]
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The first week of the new year kicked off with the same ferocity of news that the last year ended with. [Read More]
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You can bet campaign managers for sitting Republican senators up for re-election this year are smiling. Heck, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., is. Here's a tweet put out by the official McConnell Senate Committee: In the power struggle between various power centers vying for President Trump's attention, the president was thrown into the arms of McConnell with Trump's evisceration of former chief strategist Steve Bannon. Trump lashed out at Bannon after he was quoted multiple times in an explosive new book that paints the president, his son Donald Trump Jr. and the White House very... [Read More]
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The Senate is back on Wednesday, and President Trump made his way back to Washington on Monday after laying fairly low to end the year in Palm Beach, Fla., at his personal resort. His first year was a mixed bag of legislative accomplishments (tax overhaul) and failures (health care); the book is still out on his foreign policy posture; and the Russia probe continues. So what should we expect in 2018? There are four areas of domestic policy the president is particularly focused on, according to the White House — immigration, infrastructure, welfare and health care. ... [Read More]
The president is back in Washington, D.C., after spending the holidays in Palm Beach. What are the top items on his agenda for the new year? NPR's political editor has ideas on what to watch. [Read More]
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The Russia probe, led by special counsel Robert Mueller, was chosen as the top political story of the year. It narrowly beat out the sweeping story of fallout from sexual harassment, which touched on every industry and caused the resignations of a senator and members of Congress and continues. The selection happened through Twitter, where more than 4,700 users voted on the final match up of a March Madness-style 64-story tournament. The final four included the Women's March and the firing of James Comey, the former FBI director. It was a clear indication of what readers saw as the... [Read More]
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6-seed Travel Ban over No. 3 Gutting Obamacare, 53-47. In another close contest, 3-seed Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's appointment narrowly beat out No. 6 North Korea missile tests and Trump calling Kim Jong Un "Rocket Man," 51-49. Also, perhaps surprisingly, two 5-seeds beat No. 4s... [Read More]
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Voting continues Wednesday for you to decide the top political story of the year. After the first round of voting, there are 32 stories left with some big match ups ahead. [Read More]
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What's the biggest political story of the year? It's too hard to decide. You can pick in our March Madness-style bracket contest. Get your bracket before noon Tuesday. [Read More]
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Republicans in Congress are likely to pass their tax bill this week, raising questions about House Speaker Paul Ryan's future and what, if anything, will happen next year... [Read More]
Florida Senator Marco Rubio says he can't support a tax bill that doesn't contain the child tax credit. That could complicate Republican efforts to pass a tax overhaul plan before Christmas. [Read More]
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No matter what happens in Alabama on Tuesday, it will have consequences that stretch from Birmingham to the Beltway. [Read More]
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Democrat Al Franken deciding to resign from the Senate Thursday amid allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct now sets off a chain of events that could give Republicans an unexpected target in 2018. Here's a look at how it would all play out: What would happen right away? Minnesota's Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton, a former senator himself, would appoint a successor. (Minnesota is one of 36 states in which governors have the power to fill a Senate vacancy.) Dayton is expected to act quickly. Who might he pick? He's reportedly considering to appointing Lt.... [Read More]
Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit... [Read More]
Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit... [Read More]
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Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., said he will step down from Congress as of Tuesday, amid allegations of sexual misconduct leveled by multiple women. Conyers told a Detroit radio show this morning that "I am retiring today," though he is effectively resigning. He also said in an interview on The Mildred Gaddis Show that he wants his son, John Conyers III to succeed him in Congress. Michigan law says it's up to the governor to call a special election to fill the seat. Conyers spoke from an undisclosed hospital, according to his attorney, where he is being... [Read More]
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After anti-Trump texts between FBI agents, expect conservative allies of the president to allege that special counsel Robert Mueller and his investigators have an anti-Trump agenda. [Read More]
The Senate tax bill has moved to the debate stage. Also, Jared Kushner has met with investigators who are looking into possible collusion between Russian officials and the Trump presidential campaign. [Read More]
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Sen. Al Franken said Monday he would not resign from office after allegations of sexual harassment have been leveled against him. "I know that I've let a lot of people down," Franken said, noting that he was looking forward to getting back to work. "My colleagues, my staff, my supporters and everyone who has counted on me to be a champion for women. To all of you, I just want to again say I am sorry. I know there are know magic words I can say to regain your trust. He said the process will take time... [Read More]
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