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Satellite image of thunderstorm activity associated with the low pressure system identified as Invest 99 by the National Hurricane Center. Forecasters expect the storms to be disrupted by wind shear over the next day, which is making it difficult to predict when the system will become a tropical depression or storm, and where it's headed. [Read More]
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The National Hurricane Center is following three areas of disturbed weather in the Florida Straits, in orange; the Caribbean, in yellow; and the central Atlantic, in red, on Friday afternoon (Sept. 9). [Read More]
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Disturbed weather from a low pressure system in the northern Bahamas has little chance of forming a tropical depression over the next few days, according to the National Hurricane Center. [Read More]
Strong upper-level winds should limit development of this system while it drifts northward or northeastward during the next few days. [Read More]
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Hurricane forecasters on Thursday evening continue to monitor a low pressure system expected to bring rains over the Caribbean Sea. [Read More]
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An elongated area of low pressure from southwest to northeast across the southwestern and central Caribbean Sea has a 20 percent chance of turning into a cyclone in the next 48 hours, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said on Thursday. [Read More]
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During a high-stakes year when numerous intense hurricanes made landfall, the National Hurricane Center nailed track forecasts with unprecedented accuracy. [Read More]
This year the National Hurricane Center had its best year ever forecasting hurricane tracks in the Atlantic Basin. This means next years hurricane track cone will get narrower. [Read More]
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Gradual development of this system is still possible. [Read More]
000AXNT20 KNHC 122337 TWDATTropical Weather DiscussionNWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL636 PM EST Sun Nov 12 2017Tropical Weather Discussion for North America, Central AmericaGulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, northern sections of SouthAmerica, and Atlantic Ocean to the African coast from theEquator to 32N. The following information is based on satelliteimagery, weather observations, radar and meteorological analysis.Based on 1800 UTC surface analysis and satellite imagery through2245 UTC....ITCZ/MONSOON TROUGH...The Intertropical Convergence Zone axis extends from the Africancoast near 08N13W to 09N35W to 08N51W to 06N58W. Scatteredmoderate convection is from 03N-12N between... [Read More]
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The low could acquire some subtropical characteristics by the middle of next week while it moves generally northeastward. [Read More]
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Rina is expected to become a post-tropical cyclone Wednesday night or Thursday. [Read More]
The 17th storm large enough to earn its own name has formed in the Atlantic Ocean, making Tropical Storm Rina the latest in an already above-average hurricane season, forecasters said Tuesday.As of 1500 GMT, Rina posed no threat to land, and was churning in the open Atlantic 905 miles (1,455 kilometers) east of Bermuda, the Miami-based National Hurricane Center said.With maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour (65 kilometers), the storm was headed in a northeasterly direction, moving at a speed of 12 miles per hour (19 kilometers per hour).Rina's pace was expected to pick up throughout the... [Read More]
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The 17th named storm of this hyperactive Atlantic season, Tropical Storm Rina, was christened by the NOAA/NWS National Hurricane Center at 10 pm EDT Monday. [Read More]
Tropical Storm Rina has formed far out in the Atlantic Ocean where it poses no immediate threat to land. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Rina has formed about 890 miles (1,430 kilometers) east of Bermuda. There are... [Read More]
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On Monday, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) upgraded an area of disturbed weather in the open Atlantic as the 19th tropical depression of the season. Late Monday, the system to strengthened Trop... [Read More]
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Tropical Depression 19 has become Tropical Storm Rina, according to the National Hurricane Center's 10 p.m. release. [Read More]
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Tropical Storm Rina has formed far out in the Atlantic Ocean where it poses no immediate threat to land. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Rina has formed about 890 miles (1,430 kilometers) east of Bermuda. It has maximum sustained winds of 40 mph (65 kph). The storm is currently moving to... [Read More]
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The National Hurricane Center has upgraded a broad area of low pressure into a tropical depression. [Read More]
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The National Hurricane Center is issuing advisories on tropical depression 19, which could become Rina today. The depression, which is 900 miles east of Bermuda, is no threat to the U.S., but notable during this busy hurricane season for its potential to become the 17th name storm of the year. Hurricane center forecasters have been watching this area for formation since Friday, but designated the system a depression this morning with 35... [Read More]
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